Maxim Ksuta

russian artist, contemporary art, sculpture, installation, photography

Tag: conceptual art

New group exhibition-“GOLDWASSER”, KultProekt, CUBE, Moscow

Basel Art Center – “X-Nowness”

From the series – “Polaroid Dreams”

Photo by Yana Tibben

Voskhod Gallery, OBDN Gallery and Art Catch Gallery present ‘X-Nowness’, a collective exhibition supported by Voices of Culture, which opens at Basel Art Center on June 16th.

The project brings together 38 contemporary artists and art groups, and offers a vision on the concept of time and the so-called ‘nowness’ — the quality or state of existing or occurring in or belonging to the present time. 

‘Time is not linear and doesn’t consist of discrete physical points. Rather, it is perceived as a frightening shift, chasing itself, at times running faster or on the contrary falling behind. Nowness itself is followed by its own ghost, some x-unknown. X-nowness can be represented as an innumerable diversity of variations of reality, an area inhabited by ghosts and not linked to any time. This invisible schism is actually a dynamic link between the past and the present, that is felt and exposed by the artists in the physical world. Their artworks exist temporally, as a glimmer between the past and the future, between the reality and the allegories for the reality’ (by Dasha Yartseva) 

@voskhod_gallery @obdnnie @artcatch.art

16 — 22 June 2022

Basel Art Center

Blockchain

320 см, Steel chain

New group exhibition-“The Thinking Landscape”, Museum of Moscow

Site-specific installation – The Thinking Landscape vol-I, The Thinking Landscape vol-II.

New solo exhibition – “Architectonics”, Triumph gallery

Zen Garden
Maxim Ksuta’s artistic practice is extremely diverse, operating on the iterface of various media, including painting, drawing, photography, video, installation, as well as going far in terms of thematic variety, adding intellectual, scholarly, even almost scientific elements on top of the creative. The new project remains faithful to Maxim’s knack for serialised production, which enables a contemplative and consistent, almost lablike deep dives into the techniques and effects that are of interest to the artist. The new Architectonics exhibition comprises several series by the artist.
Projects by Ksuta have repeatedly addressed the links between the particular and the abstract. In his project The Expulsion dating back to 2007, the dense calligraphy and lettering produced emergent anthropomorphic figures, whereas the 2013 photo series CY, which was inspired by the art of Cy Twombly, had pictures of natural objects that were freely combined into natural abstractions. The Horizons series of canvases, based on EEG readings of the brain, transforms the brain waves into mountainscapes, whereby the outlines of mountain peaks are gradually dissolved in the pastel-coloured atmospheric fog.
The Tectonic Painting monochrome series was inspired by the projectionists of the Method Group and here the artist explores the intricacies of interaction between richly textured painting and the viewer’s gaze as a function of lighting effects and point of view. It’s hard to tell whether the audience becomes the subject of the experiment or the artist’s co-contributor. These works by Ksuta are much closer to canvases by Pierre Soulages who is obsessed with the idea of manifesting the substance of light than, for example, the sculpture-like canvas planes of Jason Martin’s black series. Unlike Soulages, however, Ksuta’s uninterrupted brushwork generates mirages of abstracted landscapes that depict sand dunes and futuristic cities.
The Shards of Memory series of objects features small, tabletop sculptures that emanate proper traits of monumental and even grand pieces. Carved in different stone varieties, these are almost like uncovered ancient artefacts, partially submersed in sand and partially washed out by time. It is hard to discern at first glance whether one is looking at some miniature mock-ups of sacred buildings or, similarly to Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, has grown to immeasurable proportions after having taken the potion. This exhibition by Maxim Ksuta virtually places us into a Japanese Zen Garden, intended for meditation and connection with nature. As one’s eye glide over the wavy black surfaces of the Tectonic Series or examine the coarse surfaces of the miniature Shards, it is there, at the epicentre of an endless whirlpool of urban energies, where one actually feels the time freeze in the still crispy air, while the body is infused with calm and content. The magic in Maxim Ksuta’s work provides the viewer with a remarkable experience of an aware, evenly paced, lived moment in all its fullness, purity, and uniqueness.
Polina Mogilina

Tectonic painting
My current practice focuses on paintings that interact actively with the ambient lighting due to their execution: monochrome (soot black) and textured uninterrupted brushwork. The brushwork structure is such that the painting plane interferes with and diffracts the light. This produces a visual effect of a fluid flow whenever the viewing angle is altered. Grouped ogether, these works are dedicated to the Method Group, an early-20th century members of the rojectionism movement.
‘The theme should be given such autistic expression and such mode of presentation that the viewer, when he perceives it, not only receives new knowledge of the system of modernity, but also undergoes new biomorphic processes, develops new mental systems, new systems for perception of the world’, the projectionists claimed. The idea that this completely different functional purpose for a painting is possible
inspired me to make the Tectonic Series.

Muqarnas
As I continued to explore pseudoperiodic mosaics and fractals, I investigated aperiodic ornaments, the kind that do not form a repeated pattern on the wall. Then, the variations of scale came into play: massive ornaments can be seen at a distance whereas finer patterns, the comprising parts of the larger ones, can only be seen up close. In order to build each element, I was guided in the application and orientation of my brushwork based on Penrose tiling. The resulting structure appears threedimensional and changes dynamically depending on the angle of viewing. It is also not unlike the reference I used — muqarnas, a common element in traditional Arabic and Persian architecture.

Horizons
The paintings, which look like aerial views, are in fact modified brain electroencephalograms. The curves were plotted by an EEG machine during a small experiment. The subject hooked up to the machine was shown panels colored in one of several earth tones, and the response of the nervous system to this stimulus was recorded. The signals corresponding to the tones were then used to paint the landscapes

New group exhibition-“Rome-ours”!

Random photo part-II

Full set photos

New exhibition – “Break 15 minutes”

Work of Labor №1 2012-2013, Steel, wood, 24.5x53x25.5cm

Work of Labor is an object that can be interpreted as a tuning fork. It helps the viewer to calibrate attention to a certain emotional wawe of perception, unburdened by the taxing philosophical references of footnotes. The artist took several months to methodically saw in half a crowbar, then polish it to a mirror shine, and finally rejoin the two pieces. Resulting from unsophisticated but laborious effort is an object that has lost its primary function as a working implement, and has become a “work of labor” and also a work of art.

New project

https://muybridgeseries.wordpress.com

A Memória da Pessoa /O Destino da Sociedade. Rússia

A Memória da Pessoa /O Destino da Sociedade. Rússia

Artistas:
Maxim Ksuta Nikita Pirogov Svetlana Pozharskaya Dmitry Vyshemirsky

Curadora:
Irina Chmyreva
em parceria com PhotoVisa, International Festival of Photography, Russia

Via … … … …