Maxim Ksuta

russian artist, contemporary art, sculpture, installation, photography

Tag: Metaphysical photo

“Hearthrug” – TOPSY‑TURVY series

Hearthrug

 My photo -“Hearthrug” in SpallArt

The private art collection SpallArt initially evolved from the enthusiasm for the diversity of possibilities that photography uses to obstruct, to deny and to challenge our perception.
The art collector Andra Spallart acquired first contemporary photographic works in the mid 1980s – after its move to Vienna in 1995, the constantly growing collection got a clear orientation and emphasis: contemporary photography from Austria – certainly with reference to the European context.

http://www.sammlung-spallart.at/en/

http://www.sammlung-spallart.at/en/kuenstler/381/maxim-ksuta/

embrace the boundless

embrace the boundlessembrace the boundless

Impossible picture of the night sky
160х160 см

“The new nothing”

"The new nothing"

Maxim Ksuta “Topsy-Turvy”

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I`am, Wolfgang Gantner, Ustina Yakovleva – my exhibition 15 may 2014 Triumph gallery

Maxim Ksuta “Topsy-Turvy”

Maxim Ksuta is perhaps the only Russian artist who, from project to project, consistently  studies the technical and technological capabilities of photography: the focus for his interest lies not in the sphere of the photographic image as such (Ksuta, it seems, is not about the image and its suggestive characteristics), but in manipulations of the image received, the decomposition of the photographic process into separate stages and incredibly varied mechanical deconstructions of the image in order, from the artifacts resulting from that deconstruction, to recreate a whole, to reorder the pieces that have broken up and to establish new links.

Ksuta plays with reality, using his construction set on it, as it were, as if it can be put through a basic reconstruction as the player wills it; at the same time, he is motivated by another significant circumstance which, in one way or another, could be seen in his very earliest works.

Ksuta is categorically at odds with visible reality: at odds with it in the sense that he unavoidably seeks symmetry and order within it, a visual logic which even in its faults helps us to discover beauty.He is always searching for a certain structure, he often invents it, he “imposes” it on landscapes, people, objects; he embeds a skeletal framework into the mass of chance visual impressions.

In a similar way, in his project for Triumph Gallery, Ksuta purges reality, demonstrating in space the basic photographic principle of positive/negative.

At the same time, he distinguishes one state from another with a barely visible, almost transparent border. For Ksuta, the image of the border, of division, is in fact very important – it is a special space, around and within which we can find everything that exists, and reality (as if confronted by a certain danger) acquires a very concentrated form; the border is a manifestation of the essence, passing through it is always a symbolic act of changing one’s state, and Ksuta skillfully plays with this within the space of the gallery.

The Topsy-Turvy project (the ironic title does nothing to diminish the seriousness of the undertaking) returns the spectator to another consideration that is key to the history of photography: Where does its objectivity and “truthfulness” begin and end, how far apart are visible and photographic reality?

Frequently repeated doubts regarding photography’s ability to reflect what is happening or what exists (this can be seen most distinctly in the works of the artists of the Düsseldorf School) find their latest expression in Maxim Ksuta’s project.

He does not try to get to the essence of reality, nor to capture the transience of movement or the equilibrium of color; instead, he concentrates on the essence of photography itself, the photographic process, breaking the shot down into the positive and the negative, mercilessly laying bear the structure.

Ksuta is not drawn to the visionary, he is drawn to the laboratory type of approach, employing serious scientific apparatus and the required devices. And, intriguingly, it is in this that the artist’s real ethic is revealed, the honesty of the gesture, the coherence of the program that makes possible not just the creation of new photographic series but also the ability to think with space, with physical volumes where marvelous transitions and transformations take place.

Ekaterina Inozemtseva

My project is entirely devoted to a comprehension of a stunning technology discovered about 150 years ago that has become very commonplace and everyday in recent times thanks to its mass distribution as a very convenient tool for the conveying of information. I tried to lay out and note the striking semantic and spatial emphases that form both the process itself and the discussion around modern photography.

The series of works follows a principle whereby the experience of modern art is founded on contradiction, on non-conformism, and a thesis which maintains that every subsequent step rejects the preceding step. As a result of that, I’m continuing my experiment in the changing of “photography’s state of equilibrium,” taking it out of the sphere of a documentary reflection of events and into the space of the atmospheric and the purely sensual.

Exhibiting the project as site-specific art, I’m striving to get the spectator involved in the scene of the installation, further activating his sensitivity. “The border of the division” – that’s the main conceptual highway around which the body of the composition of the project is constructed. The constructive element is the direct negative and the large photo accumulation. Why specifically the “border”?

The “border” implies a broad range of opening horizons and vectors in notional tendencies. The border and marginality are fields that haven’t been studied in great depth In the photographic process. Photography is so objective that this super-reality firmly links us with stereotypes of interpretation, shackling the imagination. Nevertheless, it is the border of the “negative”-“positive” division that fundamentally links the concepts of before and after.

A key role in the installation is played by the unfolding story of a journey between realities that are both objective, as they have been through the obyektiv — the Russian for “lens” – and been captured, but there are qualitative differences in content, as they are elements in the world and anti-world – who or what lies on which side is for you to decide.

Maxim Ksuta

All photos … … … …

Topsy-Turvy 16.05.2014 – 01.06.2014, Triumph gallery

Topsy-Turvy
16.05.2014 – 01.06.2014, Triumph gallery

FINAL_inverse_flip

Maxim Ksuta is perhaps the only Russian artist who, from project to project, consistently  studies the technical and technological capabilities of photography: the focus for his interest lies not in the sphere of the photographic image as such (Ksuta, it seems, is not about the image and its suggestive characteristics), but in manipulations of the image received, the decomposition of the photographic process into separate stages and incredibly varied mechanical deconstructions of the image in order, from the artifacts resulting from that deconstruction, to recreate a whole, to reorder the pieces that have broken up and to establish new links. Ksuta plays with reality, using his construction set on it, as it were, as if it can be put through a basic reconstruction as the player wills it; at the same time, he is motivated by another significant circumstance which, in one way or another, could be seen in his very earliest works. Ksuta is categorically at odds with visible reality: at odds with it in the sense that he unavoidably seeks symmetry and order within it, a visual logic which even in its faults helps us to discover beauty. He is always searching for a certain structure, he often invents it, he “imposes” it on landscapes, people, objects; he embeds a skeletal framework into the mass of chance visual impressions.

In a similar way, in his project for Triumph Gallery, Ksuta purges reality, demonstrating in space the basic photographic principle of positive/negative. At the same time, he distinguishes one state from another with a barely visible, almost transparent border. For Ksuta, the image of the border, of division, is in fact very important – it is a special space, around and within which we can find everything that exists, and reality (as if confronted by a certain danger) acquires a very concentrated form; the border is a manifestation of the essence, passing through it is always a symbolic act of changing one’s state, and Ksuta skillfully plays with this within the space of the gallery.

The Topsy-Turvy project (the ironic title does nothing to diminish the seriousness of the undertaking) returns the spectator to another consideration that is key to the history of photography: Where does its objectivity and “truthfulness” begin and end, how far apart are visible and photographic reality? Frequently repeated doubts regarding photography’s ability to reflect what is happening or what exists (this can be seen most distinctly in the works of the artists of the Düsseldorf School) find their latest expression in Maxim Ksuta’s project. He does not try to get to the essence of reality, nor to capture the transience of movement or the equilibrium of color; instead, he concentrates on the essence of photography itself, the photographic process, breaking the shot down into the positive and the negative, mercilessly laying bear the structure. Ksuta is not drawn to the visionary, he is drawn to the laboratory type of approach, employing serious scientific apparatus and the required devices. And, intriguingly, it is in this that the artist’s real ethic is revealed, the honesty of the gesture, the coherence of the program that makes possible not just the creation of new photographic series but also the ability to think with space, with physical volumes where marvelous transitions and transformations take place.

Ekaterina Inozemtseva

__________________________________________________

My project is entirely devoted to a comprehension of a stunning technology discovered about 150 years ago that has become very commonplace and everyday in recent times thanks to its mass distribution as a very convenient tool for the conveying of information. I tried to lay out and note the striking semantic and spatial emphases that form both the process itself and the discussion around modern photography.

The series of works follows a principle whereby the experience of modern art is founded on contradiction, on non-conformism, and a thesis which maintains that every subsequent step rejects the preceding step. As a result of that, I’m continuing my experiment in the changing of “photography’s state of equilibrium,” taking it out of the sphere of a documentary reflection of events and into the space of the atmospheric and the purely sensual.

Exhibiting the project as site-specific art, I’m striving to get the spectator involved in the scene of the installation, further activating his sensitivity. “The border of the division” – that’s the main conceptual highway around which the body of the composition of the project is constructed. The constructive element is the direct negative and the large photo accumulation. Why specifically the “border”?

The “border” implies a broad range of opening horizons and vectors in notional tendencies. The border and marginality are fields that haven’t been studied in great depth In the photographic process. Photography is so objective that this super-reality firmly links us with stereotypes of interpretation, shackling the imagination. Nevertheless, it is the border of the “negative”-“positive” division that fundamentally links the concepts of before and after.

A key role in the installation is played by the unfolding story of a journey between realities that are both objective, as they have been through the obyektiv — the Russian for “lens” – and been captured, but there are qualitative differences in content, as they are elements in the world and anti-world – who or what lies on which side is for you to decide.

Maxim Ksuta

Via … … … …

СONTEMPORARY DRAWING (Marble Palace)

The general aim of the exhibition is to present the specifics of functioning of drawing in contemporary Russian art. The basic section on the show brings together the works of the 1990-2000’s but also there are presented the earlier materials connected mostly with conceptualism of Soviet time. The exposition presents the different ways of actualization of art of drawing and its technique side. Nowadays the drawing is not linked only with the pencil and paper and deviates from norm – it conquers new territories and tests new untraditional materials. It also  breaks the narrow frameworks of this view of art and like such new media as photography and video become one of universal languages in contemporary culture.

The exposition presents the following views of actual drawing:

  • Traditional drawing connected with new forms, expressive means and situations, manipulation with expressive means of academic study drawing, enlargement to the dimension of canvas, including in the installations.
  • Conceptual drawing including the period of creation of this trend (Medical Germenevtika Inspection project, D.Prigov, D.Alekseyev).
  • Postconceptual drawing as the reaction on the virtual reality (I.Razumov, J.Zastava, M.Sha).
  • Expansion of drawing on the territory of photograph and active intercommunication with this view of art (M.Ksuta, E.Gor, G.Majophis, V.Mamyshev-Monro).
  • So-called Another drawing, where the pencil and quill are substituted with acetylene welding outfit, laser and point, line – with metal cane, wire, needles and cottons, and sheet of paper – with wall or real space (D.Gutov, T.Ahmetgalieva, M.Arendt).
  • Drawing that uses the traditions of comic strip (J. Alexandrov, G.Litichevsky).
  • Contemporary so-called Societal drawing – reportages from meetings and judge sessions, graffiti (V.Lomasko, V.Salnikov, Pasha 183).
  • Drawing on alien surfaces (human body) (Tanatos Banionis, ESCAPE program, V.Aizenberg)
  • Drawing, video and computer: forms of intercommunication (D.Ter-Oganjan, V.Pushnitsky).        

 The exhibition is supported by Peter and Irene Ludwig Foundation

Via … … … …

Maxim Ksuta – “CY”, Triumph Gallery

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Over the course of recent years, Maxim Ksuta has been developing an entirely unique relationship to photography: he has consistently removed or weakened the firm bond between the photographic image and visible reality, the camera in his hands becoming not a means for “baring” or “revealing” reality or a means for freezing it in as concentrated form as possible – Ksuta’s camera, instead, almost appears to be overcoming the camera’s technological nature, and Ksuta himself, rather than pressing on the shutter button, appears to be painting with a brush or a charcoal  pencil. He consciously forms not a shot but a sheet with geometric abstractions; his works begin to work to the laws of the drawing sheet, rather than the photographic print, as was the case in his previous series with electric cables cutting through the Moscow sky in dynamic diagonals.
The theme for Ksuta’s latest project appears to be far more inventive, because the starting point for the visual experiments turns out to be another work of art, specifically the work of the great American abstractionist Cy Twombly. Ksuta doesn’t relish the proportions, the balance of vacuums and the coloured “nervous” zones; he doesn’t occupy himself with deciphering Twombly’s codes, which reference the whole of world culture and history; he intently and intensively scrutinizes. His eye singles out, isolates the intricate movement of the pencil lines; at the same time it is clear that Ksuta is sincerely enraptured by the freedom of movement of Twombly, who crosses out, sketches and colours with the ingenuousness of a child who has been sat before a sheet of paper and given coloured crayons for the first time. Ksuta is posed a question about the nature of this freedom, of its ideal prototype, if you will, and finds astonishing formal correspondences in Twombly’s “writings” and the sticks, branches, blades of grass that fall under your feet during a walk. He creates a distinctive negative for Twombly’s paintings, a purely monochrome structure, consistently purifying Twombly, testing the viability of his plasticity among real natural objects. It is as if Ksuta is bearing witness to the natural, most organic provenance of Twombly’s art, making the dynamic of his objects literal, perceptible – this is not some conditional drive of colour flows, lines within the borders of a canvas, but a real walk, a stroll, during which the artistic forms are discovered beneath one’s feet, and with a clumsy movement one can disturb the fragile harmony. The appeals of the artist himself to the image of an enchanted forest, a magical, almost

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fairytale space, where everything that is familiar is suddenly miraculously revealed is no accident in this regard, and a walk through this forest is transformed into an allegory of life’s path (or the path of an artist) that is entirely in the spirit of Novalis. Along the way, Maxim Ksuta  ontinues to resolve his own task, a task that has occupied him in recent times: He is feeling out a barely perceptible zone where the abstract and the concrete coexist. The concrete object is often embodied in the most abstract of forms, it loses its recognizable outlines, but it retains its essence: a branch remains a branch, wormwood thickets remain wormwood, and the viewer is enchanted by the game of form, the glimmering of the perceptible and the visible that, when viewing Ksuta’s photographs, it is so easy to give in to. He follows the logic of a “new objectivity,” recalling in memory the German “Neue Sachlichkeit”; at the same time as many young European artists (for the most part coming from Eastern Europe, of the general of Wilhelm Sasnal), he sees in this an opportunity for quiet deliverance, he suddenly understands that the diapason of variations can be as broad as you like, and with an artisanal persistence (in the very finest sense of the ancient techne’) continues to move
through this magical space, sometimes drawing into his orbit the great artists of the 20th century.

Ekaterina Inosemtseva

Cy – catalog

“Афиша”: В галерее “Триумф” проходит выставка Максима Ксуты CY

http://www.m24.ru/videos/13803

upcoming event 7 — 17 March 2013

Artgude

upcoming event 7 — 17 March 2013

Maxim Ksuta. CYgo

Triumph Gallery